Quotes for
the Journey:

Eleanor
Roosevelt



It is not fair to ask of
others what you are
not willing to do yourself.

   

For it isn't enough to talk about peace. One must believe in it. And it isn't enough to believe in it. One must work at it.

   

A mature person is one who does not think only in absolutes, who is able to be objective even when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and in all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably with the circumstances of life, knowing that in this world no one is all knowing and therefore all of us need both love and charity.

   
No one can make you feel inferior without your consent.
   

Nearly all great civilizations that perished did so because they had crystallized, because they were incapable of adapting themselves to new conditions, new methods, new points of view.  It is as though people would literally rather die than change.

   
In the long run we shape our lives and we shape ourselves.  The process never ends until we die.  And the choices we make are ultimately our own responsibility.
    
A successful life for a man or for a woman seems to me to lie in the knowledge that one has developed to the limit the capacities with which one was endowed; that one has contributed something constructive to family and friends and to a home community; that one has brought happiness wherever it was possible; that one has earned one's way in the world, has kept some friends, and need not be ashamed to face oneself honestly.

All human beings have failings, all human beings have needs and temptations and stresses.  Men and women who live together through long years get to know one another's failings; but they also come to know what is worthy of respect and admiration in those they live with and in themselves.  If at the end one can say, "This man used to the limit the powers that God granted him; he was worthy of love and respect and of the sacrifices of many people, made in order that he might achieve what he deemed to be his task," then that life has been lived well and there are no regrets.
    
So much attention is paid to the aggressive sins, such as violence and cruelty and greed with all their tragic effects, that too little attention is paid to the passive sins, such as apathy and laziness, which in the long run can have a more devastating and destructive effect upon society than the others.
   
When you cease to make a contribution, you begin to die.
   
Somehow we learn who we really are and then live with that decision.
  
I have never given very deep thought to a philosophy of life, though I have a few ideas that I think are useful to me.  One is that you do whatever comes your way as well as you can, and another is that you think as little as possible about yourself and as much as possible about other people and about things that are interesting.  The third is that you get more joy out of giving joy to others and should put a good deal of thought into the happiness that you are able to give.
  
Friendship with oneself is all-important, because without it one cannot be friends with anyone else.
  

   
The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.
   
Remember always that you have not only the right to be an individual, you have an obligation to be one.
  
I could not, at any age, be content to take my place by the fireside and simply look on.  Life was meant to be lived.  Curiosity must be kept alive.  One must never, for whatever reason, turn his or her back on life.
   
A mature person is one who is does not think only in absolutes, who is able to be objective even when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably with the circumstances of life, knowing that in this world no one is all-knowing and therefore all of us need both love and charity.
   
You gain strength, courage and confidence by every experience in which you really stop to look fear in the face. . . .  You must do the thing you think you cannot do.
   
No one from the beginning of time has had security.
   

   
I believe that anyone can conquer fear by doing the things they fear to do, provided they keep doing them until they get a record of successful experiences behind them.
  
When you have decided what you believe, what you feel must be done, have the courage to stand alone and be counted.
   
The only person who makes no mistakes is the person who never does anything.
   
Usefulness, whatever form it may take, is the price we should pay for the air we breathe and the food we eat and the privilege of being alive.
   
Do not be afraid of mistakes, providing you do not make the same one twice.
  
When you get to the end of your rope--tie a knot in it and hang on.
   
Every time you meet a situation, though you think at the time it is an impossibility and you go through the torture of the damned, once you have met it and lived through it, you find that forever you are freer than you were before.
   
A little simplification would be the first step toward rational living, I think.
   

   
One thing we know beyond all doubt:  Nothing has ever been achieved by the person who says, "It can't be done."
  
When will our consciences grow so tender that we will act to prevent human misery rather than avenge it?
   
As for accomplishments, I just did what I had to do as things came along.
   
All big changes in human history have been arrived at slowly and through many compromises.
   
Anyone who knows history, particularly the history of Europe, will, I think, recognize that the domination of education or of government by any one particular religious faith is never a happy arrangement for the people.
   
I could not at any age be content to take my place in a corner by the fireside and simply look on.
  

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